Reading Tack – T.J. Moretti

Before I could read well, I would read diagonally. I’d start at the first few words of a paragraph then coast southeast until I came to the last paragraph. I’d read pages, chapters that way. I think my first experience with this reading tactic was high school freshman year: I had to read Martian Chronicles, so I tacked through it. I haven’t picked up the book since, and I have no idea what it is about, except Martians.

Reading Black Women Writers Saved My Life – Timothy Lyle

“Reading Black Women Writers Saved My Life” I remember the first time I uttered these words aloud to an audience. In fact, it was the first time I’d ever said them or, honestly, had ever thought them at all—at least in the frank and urgent manner in which I delivered them at that moment. I

Speaking on Their Own Terms: Trans Women and Representation – Timothy Lyle

Timothy Lyle Initially, I had planned to compose a blog post structured by hashtags and infused with tweet-able moments about how and why I use social media in the literature classroom. But after careful consideration of recent current events, I have changed my mind—an often frustrating decision that is indicative of a life-long penchant for

Words I Loathe (part 1) – Aaron Rosenfeld

Aaron Rosenfeld As my students know, I loathe the word “relatable.” They know because I always tell them, usually early in the semester, and there is always a casualty (and to those unfortunates, I offer an overdue apology, along with my unstinting gratitude for supplying me with my teaching moment). I had not even heard

Major Day ’15

Students met Anna Clark, Timothy Lyle, and Ivy Stabell to discover that the English Major at Iona College is a degree for the 21st century. #WeNeedDiverseBooks, and that’s what many Iona English courses offer.  So students on Major Day were happy, because English. Why English? Because English moves us beyond phonies. All students matter.  Their success matters,

Starting Convos – Dr. Dean Defino

Conversations start when two or more people share something in common.  It may be something very basic, like standing in the same place at the same time (“Do you know if the bus is running on time?”; “I think that penguin just winked at us”), or something more profound, like a shared passion.  If you